Coming Up for Air

WildFly and Micrometer

Earlier in the summer, I wrote some about the addition of OpenTelemetry support in WildFly. With the release of WildFly 25, that support is now official and in the wild. With 25 behind us, we start looking at 26, and my next effort will be to integrate Micrometer metrics into the server. In this post, we’ll take a look at what that might mean, as well as presenting a way to take an early look.

A Quarkus Command Line Application

Most people know Quarkus as a great way to build fast, scalable microservices. What many may not be aware of, however, is that Quarkus can also be used to build command line applications as well. In this post, we’ll take a look at how we can leverage the Quarkus ecosystem we already know to build a command line utility quickly and easily.

OpenTelemetry and Jakarta REST Services

Knowing what’s going on in your microservices deployment is extremely important when something goes wrong. In a distributed system, though, it can be difficult to know where things have gone wrong. That’s where a tracing system such as OpenTelemetry can be immensely valuable. In this post, we’ll build two simple services, one of which calls the other, and trace the execution from end to end.

A Simple Jakarta EE 9.1 REST Project

Jakarta EE 9.1 was released today, which now lets developers use — officially — Java 11 with the shiny new Jakarta EE namespace introduce in EE 9. So what does a simple Jakarta EE 9.1 REST project look like? I’m so glad you asked. :)

Securing and Testing Quarkus Applications using Keycloak and Wiremock

Obviously, web apps need to be secured. If you’re brave (and some might say foolish), you can roll your own security. Unless you have compelling reasons to do so, however, you probably shouldn’t. Almost as if by design (nyuk nyuk), Quarkus makes it easy to use any OpenID Connect server. One such server is Keycloak, an open source offering also from Red Hat. If your experience is like mine, though, securing endpoints makes testing a touch more complicated. In this post, I’d like to present and walk through a complete example of a secured Quarkus app, using Keycloak, JUnit and Wiremock.

Merry Christmas, 2020

Merry Christmas! After what has been a tough year, my prayer is that this Christmas season will be relaxing and refreshing for us all. To help celebrate the season — I hope — I’ve embedded my church’s Christmas program, Christmas Under the Arches. My prayer is that it encourages you all and helps you focus on the Reason we celebrate. :)

Java 15: New and Notable

JDK 15 hit General Availability today. While I spend most of my time in Kotlin these days, I do keep a close on Java, as it still has a special place in my heart, so I thought I’d make a quick post highlighting some of its new features. :) There are quite a few changes in the release, so I’ll list all of them, but focus on the ones I think most developers will find more interesting.

Writing CLIs with Spring Boot and JCommander

I was recently asked to convert a Spring Boot-based "CLI" to a real CLI utility. It was actually just a normal Spring Boot application with REST endpoints that we’d hit with curl. Pretty ugly. After a few frustrating hours, I finally settled on a solution that seems to work pretty well for us. It uses Spring Boot, of course, as that’s our library of choice, plus JCommander for the argument handling. This is a pared-down example of how the application is structured. And because I care about of each you deeply, I’ll present it in Java AND Kotlin. :)

For those of you in a hurry, you can get the complete code in my GitHub repo. Everyone else, feel free to read along.

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